Textiles 1: Ideas and Processes Nina O'Connor

Learning Log

Exercise 1.4 Poetry Prose Lyrics

2 Comments

The course notes are helpful in reading and understanding The Myth of Orpheus (1977) and the painting is a good example of the narrative being representing in a single picture plane without being too literal.

I feel stuck.  I know there are many choices for this exercise, but I only have one song in mind and I can’t seem to get away from it.

Black Tears (feat. Jeff Beck) – Imelda May

Black Tears

one will fall for every good year

rolling down my face

inside I’m dying outside I’m crying black tears

Your kiss

killed me on that night as your lips

left a bitter taste and

inside I’m dying  outside I’m crying black tears,

How did it all go wrong?

we seemed to have it all but its broken

and I’ll  run

and I’m scared

so I pray to god above

its a sin that we don’t love

its so quiet

can you hear me?

are you there?

Black tears

please be gone so I can see clear

keep calm and carry on

but inside I’m dying outside I’m crying black tears

Oh yeah

How did it all go wrong we seemed to have it all but now its broken and I’m running and I’m scared so scared so I pray to god above cos its a sin that we don’t love its so quiet can you hear me? are you there?

Black tears one will fall for every good year rolling down my face

inside I’m dying outside I’m crying, crying, crying black tears

 

I have some external pressures and I can’t think outside the box, this song is going around and around in my head, it doesn’t offer the complexities of Orpheus, says little, but I press on, forcing myself , my thinking is so literal, although I know I it would help if it were more lateral.

We are asked to make 10 rough drawings .  Again I look to unfamiliar materials in the hope that a playfulness will ensue, but no, far too literal, ‘black tears’:

The instruction is “Be experimental and have fun, Remember drawing in this instance is a loose term, study the writing carefully and use materials that add something to the subject and contribute to the meaning of your chose poem prose or lyric”.  Trying to loosen up, I use a pipette to apply ink and a large brush.

I think to add red, a colour of love or anger and use a combination of oil pastels, watersoluble graphite and scarlet acrylic ink, which, when diluted, is warm red rather than the blue red I was hoping for.

I’m still stuck and should probably have walked away or sought further inspiration. Irritated I press on, using a large paintbrush, black and scarlet acrylic ink from a dropper.  There is more feeling and spontaneity in this drawing, but I’m not sure if it came from the heart or frustration.

DSCF6648

Using indian ink and dripping black tears onto damp paper or spraying wet ink with water, the marks were less contrived and more effective on the white than the red paper. I was quite excited by the effect of dispersing the ink with a spray which created atmosphere and a subtle mood change.

Developing the ink drips above, using Quink ink on A3 below, I find it aesthetically pleasing, There is a sadness and as the ink separates, the eye is drawn in to look at the detail which suggests more meaning to the tears.

DSCF6652

I have found this frustrating, I love books which inform, recipes or techniques, the tactility of the object, I enjoy novels, but ‘poetry, prose and lyrics’ are less appealing.  Did my view on the subject affect my approach and difficulty to think laterally?  Is it that words are less inspiring to me?

 

 

 

May, Imelda (2017)  Black Tears (feat. Jeff Beck)

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2 thoughts on “Exercise 1.4 Poetry Prose Lyrics

  1. I empathise with your battles here but I think the final image is very expressive and is an imaginative leap from the source material; the drips and fluid lines really draw the eye in.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nina, I think your use of a pipette is really inventive and the watery, blurry effect achieved captures the lyrics of the song perfectly

    Liked by 1 person

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